Air Sanitation Protects Your Investment

In many states, medical cannabis programs are the only way to legally acquire cannabis. In these states, the end customers are patients looking for relief from their suffering. They have turned to cannabis for a variety of reasons, but they can probably all agree that they expect a high-quality product that is all-natural, and free of impurities such as mold, bacteria, and pesticides. After all, conventional pharmaceuticals are produced under strict clean room conditions, leaving little doubt regarding the quality of the medicine received. Cannabis should be no different. In order to protect patients, and meet a growing demand, quality control needs to be a top concern for growers, investors, and the end user.

February 4, 2016

In many states, medical cannabis programs are the only way to legally acquire cannabis. In these states, the end customers are patients looking for relief from their suffering. They have turned to cannabis for a variety of reasons, but they can probably all agree that they expect a high-quality product that is all-natural, and free of impurities such as mold, bacteria, and pesticides. After all, conventional pharmaceuticals are produced under strict clean room conditions, leaving little doubt regarding the quality of the medicine received. Cannabis should be no different. In order to protect patients, and meet a growing demand, quality control needs to be a top concern for growers, investors, and the end user.

The rapid growth experienced in the legal cannabis industry has presented new challenges.  States and cities around the country are starting to crack down on pesticide use, resulting in an increasing number of cannabis product recalls in Colorado, a 13% lab testing failure rate in Washington and a shortage of product in states such as Nevada and Massachusetts.

In order to protect patients, and provide them the natural solution they are looking for, air quality needs to be a top concern for cultivation facilities around the country.

When pests and pathogens enter a garden, they often spread as airborne spores. Some, such as powdery mildew, can take up to two weeks to show physical signs of their presence. By the time this happens, it is too late to prevent an outbreak from infecting more plants.

Poor air quality can result in total crop loss from an outbreak in two ways: the infection visibly spreads and it is obvious the plants are no good to sell, or mostly invisible microbes infect plants, leading to failed lab testing. While having to throw out a crop knowingly seems terrible, the second option is often worse. While a plant may be able to pass multiple visual inspections, it is still possible for it to fail lab tests, leading to a product recall, leaving you with unsellable product and a hefty fine to accompany it.

Minimizing the risk of these two options can be done with the investment of air sanitizing equipment. Equipping your grow rooms with air sanitation devices can lead to cleaner air, and a reduction in the likelihood of an outbreak. For a small investment, it is possible to improve the quality of your crop, and minimize your risk of an outbreak.

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