Surna Reflector: Why Size Matters

One piece of feedback we receive often has to do with the size of the Surna Reflector. At 33x32” inches, the Surna Reflector is larger than most reflectors on the market, but for good reason.

December 3, 2015

One piece of feedback we receive often has to do with the size of the Surna Reflector. At 33×32” inches, the Surna Reflector is larger than most reflectors on the market, but for good reason.

The size of the Surna Reflector comes down to three factors:

  1. It is meant to be used indoors
  2. It creates a more even light spread.
  3. It minimizes light waste on walls and in aisles.

Indoors

One of the most popular reflectors currently used by many commercial growers is actually meant for greenhouse growing. It’s small size is designed to minimize sunlight blockage and minimize shading on the plants below when sunlight is being used.

Conversely, the Surna Reflector was designed with indoor growing in mind. It has been engineered to be the most effective reflector available for indoor cultivation, and its size reflects that.

Light Spread

Our design uses a large physical size to create a more even light spread over a 5×5 area. At the simplest level, the size of the Surna Reflector has to do with geometry – the light coming out of the reflector is very collimated, and the size assists with that.

Essentially, the shape of the reflector, combined with the sub-reflectors, allows light to be directed evenly to specific areas of interest on the canopy and not be focused or concentrated at the center of the desired footprint. This additional movement within the reflective cavity allows the Surna Reflector to create collimated light that is directed at the plant canopy, reducing light waste on aisles and walls while providing each node on the canopy with an evenly distributed light intensity; creating more uniform flower growth.

By enlarging the size of the reflector, we are able to send more light to the plant canopy as well as minimize the effects of hot spots on the plant canopy using the integrated sub-reflector assembly. Instead of sending light straight down where it will be very hot directly under the bulb, the Surna sub-reflector assembly was specifically designed to reduce bright spots within the canopy by spreading the light away from the center where hot spots are usually found.

Minimizes Light Waste

As stated above, the design of the Surna Reflector causes light to move around within the reflective cavity. This movement means collimated light is delivered to the plant canopy, which reduces light wasted on non-canopy areas. By collimating the light before it leaves the reflective cavity, the Surna Reflector is able to better control where the light ends up, ensuring it reaches the plant canopy instead of aisleways or walls.

If you are looking to grow in a greenhouse, find a reflector designed for greenhouse growing. However, if you are looking to grow indoors, the Surna Reflector is the way to go. As the cannabis industry becomes more competitive, those using tools designed for the job will be the ones who come out on top.

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