The Importance of Frequent Biosecurity Checks

The biosecurity of a cultivation facility is just as important as the physical security of the facility. The physical security includes measures such as locks, cameras, fences, lighting and more and is often, at least in part, required by law. Biosecurity includes measures such as air sanitation, dehumidification, cleaning procedures and more and is often not directly required, though can become an indirect requirement due to product testing and purity requirements.

May 5, 2016

The biosecurity of a cultivation facility is just as important as the physical security of the facility. The physical security includes measures such as locks, cameras, fences, lighting and more and is often, at least in part, required by law. Biosecurity includes measures such as air sanitation, dehumidification, cleaning procedures and more and is often not directly required, though can become an indirect requirement due to product testing and purity requirements.

While often less familiar than physical security, biosecurity (biological security) is no less important. Especially when growing for a medical market. Creating and maintaining a clean cultivation environment results in reduced pesticide and fungicide needs, a reduced risk of crop failure due to contamination and increased chances of passing any required lab tests.

Implementing an effective biosecurity system within in a cultivation facility comes down to being thorough and regularly assessing the effectiveness of both the procedures and equipment used in the quest for a biologically secure facility.

Routine assessments should be performed as often as possible, at least once a week but daily if possible, in order to catch any problems before they become critical. Routine checks also ensure the measures in place are actually working to prevent contamination within the facility.

Prevention is easier and cheaper than dealing with a contamination. A bleach wipe down of all surfaces costs less than 6 cents per wipe, whereas a crop failure or recall can cost tens of thousands of dollars and potentially create irreparable damage to your brand. Once a contaminant such as powdery mildew gets into a facility, it can be nearly impossible to remove.

Once biosecurity standard operating procedures have been established in a facility, routine checks both ensure they are working and that they are actually being followed. A large part of biosecurity comes down to relying on employees to follow proper procedure and routine checks ensure they will do so.

What to Look For

During your routine biosecurity checks, it is important to know what to look for. Here are the top things we see, but be sure to incorporate your own factors into this list.

  • Are employees following standard operating procedures?
  • Are equipment and tools being cleaned before use on a new plant?
  • Is humidity at the correct levels? Are there any spikes throughout the day?
  • Is water draining properly? Are there any standing pools of water?
  • Are there any visible signs of pests or pathogens?
  • Is the air quality at proper levels?

Routine checks will help establish a baseline for biosecurity and allow holes in the current system to be revealed before a bigger problem occurs. If at any point, your biosecurity is found to be lacking, call us and we can perform an analysis and help create a safer environment for your plants.

Share:

Featured Articles

Our Commitment to Sustainability

Being in the indoor ag industry, we view sustainability as an essential part of our company culture. We believe in the importance of taking care of the incredible planet we call home. That is why we are committed to making sure that we're doing our part to protect the environment.

What is Indoor Agriculture and Vertical Farming?

What is indoor agriculture? While cannabis cultivators have already been growing indoors for years, vertical farms could be the future of agriculture on an even larger scale.

What is MEP Engineering in Indoor Agriculture?

MEP engineers provide a wide range of engineering services necessary for any construction project, and they are especially critical when designing an energy efficient Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) grow facility. Here is what you need to know about MEP engineering in indoor farming.

5 Common Cultivation Facility Design Mistakes

Indoor agriculture facility design is far more complex than most other construction disciplines. It requires careful planning and support from specialized experts to set a grow up for success and longevity. There are 5 mistakes we commonly see when it comes to cultivation facility design.

Engineering Greatness: Meet Kenneth Loshelder, PE

Surna is extremely thankful for Kenneth and all that his team of engineers do for our company and for our clients. With over 15-years of experience, he has built a career focused on environmental consistency and energy efficiency. He encourages cultivators to engage with experienced mechanical engineers early-on in the buildout process. We asked Kenneth to answer some questions and lend valuable insight into the construction of cultivation facilities.

HVACD MEP Coordination for Cannabis Cultivation

Effective HVACD coordination is a key component in minimizing frustrating and costly construction delays in cannabis facility buildouts. There are a number of considerations your MEP team address in all stages of the project, from pre-design planning, to commissioning and beyond, in order to provide a comprehensive HVACD coordination effort.
Sign up to receive blogs and other news

© 2021 Surna. All rights reserved.

Surna Scroll to Top