Think Cubic Feet

When designing a commercial cannabis cultivation facility, many people think in terms of square footage in order to determine how many plants they are able to grow. But, if your rooms are tall enough, why limit yourself to one level? Instead of thinking in terms of square feet, it is time to start thinking in terms of cubic feet.

April 30, 2015

When designing a commercial cannabis cultivation facility, many people think in terms of square footage in order to determine how many plants they are able to grow. But, if your rooms are tall enough, why limit yourself to one level? Instead of thinking in terms of square feet, it is time to start thinking in terms of cubic feet.

Most growers already use a version of this in their nursery where it is common to stack many small plants on a tray so that more plants can be fit into a smaller space, leaving the bulk of the grow’s real estate for larger plants.

However, what few people think of when designing their grow space is that commercial cannabis cultivation does not need a lot of overhead space. If your plants are five feet tall, valuable energy is being spent to increase plant height rather than bud size. This is especially important to remember when building a cannabis grow in a warehouse. Warehouses often have high ceilings that make them ideal for building a second story of growing space.

Mezzanines can be added to an existing space for a relatively inexpensive cost and are a great way to quickly double your potential grow space. The concept is so lucrative, that Cubic Designs, a subsidy of Warren Buffet’s company Berkshire Hathaway, even sent out promotional fliers encouraging cannabis growers to “Double your Growing Space,” through the use of their mezzanine products.

With a little construction knowledge, it is possible to create your own mezzanine with materials commonly found at home improvement stores. For rooms that don’t have enough space for a full second floor, it is still possible to double your growing space by stacking plants on top of one another. This method should be reserved for vegetative rooms though because it limits your ability to trellis and illuminate the sides of a plant in flower.

One important consideration when looking to build a second story of growing space is the cooling capacity of the room under consideration. With extra growing capacity comes extra light, which means extra heat. As such, it is important to note the size of the room in terms of cubic feet instead of square feet when talking to potential cooling providers.

 

Here are a few pictures to illustrate how double-stacking a garden can work – it even allows you to use different lights on each level.

 

garden under construction Building the mezzanine

 

 

 

cannabis under LED Bottom floor

 

 

 

Stairs to second floor grow space Stairs to second floor grow space

 

 

 

cannabis grow room Top floor of grow.

 

 

Share:

Featured Articles

Our Commitment to Sustainability

Being in the indoor ag industry, we view sustainability as an essential part of our company culture. We believe in the importance of taking care of the incredible planet we call home. That is why we are committed to making sure that we're doing our part to protect the environment.

What is Indoor Agriculture and Vertical Farming?

What is indoor agriculture? While cannabis cultivators have already been growing indoors for years, vertical farms could be the future of agriculture on an even larger scale.

What is MEP Engineering in Indoor Agriculture?

MEP engineers provide a wide range of engineering services necessary for any construction project, and they are especially critical when designing an energy efficient Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) grow facility. Here is what you need to know about MEP engineering in indoor farming.

5 Common Cultivation Facility Design Mistakes

Indoor agriculture facility design is far more complex than most other construction disciplines. It requires careful planning and support from specialized experts to set a grow up for success and longevity. There are 5 mistakes we commonly see when it comes to cultivation facility design.

Engineering Greatness: Meet Kenneth Loshelder, PE

Surna is extremely thankful for Kenneth and all that his team of engineers do for our company and for our clients. With over 15-years of experience, he has built a career focused on environmental consistency and energy efficiency. He encourages cultivators to engage with experienced mechanical engineers early-on in the buildout process. We asked Kenneth to answer some questions and lend valuable insight into the construction of cultivation facilities.

HVACD MEP Coordination for Cannabis Cultivation

Effective HVACD coordination is a key component in minimizing frustrating and costly construction delays in cannabis facility buildouts. There are a number of considerations your MEP team address in all stages of the project, from pre-design planning, to commissioning and beyond, in order to provide a comprehensive HVACD coordination effort.
Sign up to receive blogs and other news

© 2021 Surna. All rights reserved.

Surna Scroll to Top